About conjurors

I am a YA fantasy author who started this blog to share the unusual places I find inspiration for my writing, and to discuss with other artists how they find their muses. My first book of The Conjurors series, Into the Dark, is now available on Amazon.

How to support an indie author for free – a first experience with the Kindle Scout Program

Check out this wonderful post onKindle Scout by my fellow indie author, Allie Potts!

Allie Potts Writes

A way to support #indieauthors for free and an Introduction to #KindleScout - www.alliepottswrites.comThis is the launch week for a young adult science fiction book called Joan the Made written by Kristen Pham. While I always enjoy celebrating my fellow indie author’s bookbirthdays, this one is special as it is the first book I helped bring to market through Amazon’s Kindle Scout Program.

I say that like I put in a lot of work.

For those who aren’t as familiar with the ever mysterious world of independent publishing, the Kindle Scout program is a way for authors to get a little financial and marketing boost from the all mighty Amazon without sacrificing all their creative control or signing away their rights for future works in the worlds they create under the guise of non-compete terms.

As I am still in the midst of rewrite, I have yet to try my hand at gaining access to the program with one of my own books…

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New Dystopian Novel Launching Today

I want to give a huge thank you to all my friends and fans who supported my Kindle Scout campaign to publish my young adult dystopian novel, Joan the Made. My novel was a winner, and it is now on sale on Amazon for $3.99.

If you love edgy young adult fiction like Hunger Games, Ready Player One, or Divergent, this series just might be your new favorite. Joan the Made tells the story of Joan Fasces’, who discovers that she is cloned from the famous Joan of Arc on her eighteenth birthday. But being cloned in America comes at a steep price. Segregated and oppressed, clones are forced to act as docile servants to the rest of the Evolved population. Joan can either run from her fate and spend the rest of her life in hiding, or she can join a Throwback rebellion populated by clones of the greatest leaders in history.

Get your copy here and let me know what you think. If you leave me a review and send me an email to let me know, I’ll even add you to my list to receive the next book in the series, Joan Undone, FREE when it releases in May of this year.

Happy Reading!

Vote for Joan the Made on Kindle Scout

After much writing, editing and general agonizing, I have finished the first book in my new trilogy, Joan the Made. This young adult series is set in the near-future, and follows Joan Fasces after she discovers that she cloned from of one of history’s greatest heroines—Joan of Arc. (Check out the full description of my novel below.)

I’ve decided to try to publish Joan the Made using the Kindle Scout program. Kindle Scout is reader-powered publishing for new, never-before-published books. It’s a place where readers help decide if a book gets published. The books that receive the most votes are published by Kindle Press.

Please vote for Joan the Made here. You will receive a FREE copy of my book if it is selected.

Book Description:

On Joan Fasces’ eighteenth birthday, she discovers that she is cloned from the famous Joan of Arc. But being cloned in America comes at a steep price. Segregated and oppressed, clones are forced to act as docile servants to the rest of the Evolved population.

Joan can either run from her fate and spend the rest of her life in hiding, or she can join a Throwback rebellion populated by clones of the greatest leaders in world history.

Author Interview: Allie Potts on Writing Near-Future Science Fiction

It’s rare to find a science fiction series that approaches world building in a truly new, fresh way. But in her series, Project Gene Assist, Allie Potts does just that. The first book in her series, The Fair and Foul, explores the idea of merging the human brain with the internet. Allie Potts weaves complex characters with futuristic technology that is at once highly original, and utterly believable.

In this interview, Allie shares how she went about creating vivid, real characters who inhabit a terrifying but thrilling new world.

What was the original inspiration for your science fiction series, Project Gene Assist?

I had just finished reading an epic fantasy series which featured the classic chosen one locked in an age old battle between the forces of good and evil and found myself wondering how that story line might have played out if the hero didn’t particularly believe in either. I veered somewhat from the original idea, but it helped keep my characters human.

You have created highly sympathetic characters in your tale. How do you approach character development?

Each of my main characters have a guiding motivation and a fear which I establish during the outlining process. These two attributes cause them to make decisions during the plot that aren’t always the best, but are at least understandable under the circumstances, which I believe makes them more relatable. After all, who isn’t guilty of poor decision making sometimes?

Your protagonist, Juliane, has a unique voice. How did you develop her personality?

I read Lisa Randall’s book on Dark Matter and the Dinosaurs to get a sense of a tone (she’s a brilliant mind in the field of particle physics and cosmology) and attempted to channel a few of my professors (both male and female) for mannerisms, but I also found myself sticking my nose up into the air while writing her early scenes. She’s not necessarily the most likable character I’ve ever written, but Juliane doesn’t care if people like her as long as they respect her.

Many of the readers of this blog are self published. Do you have any advice or marketing tips that have worked well for you?

The best thing I have done was to engage with the community. I commented on other blogs. I responded to comments made on mine. I interacted in Facebook groups, offering help and support where it was requested. In short I have focused on the relationships rather than the sales conversions which, in the long run (and face it, writing is a long game) has expanded my reach beyond what I could have done alone.

Also, never ever make a book related announcement on the same day as a Star Wars trailer gets released. In fact don’t compete with anything related to Star Wars. Pay attention to Comic-Con and mark those days on your calendar. I know this from experience.

What is the most unusual thing that has ever inspired your writing?

Probably a fire hydrant. It wasn’t particularly well kept and caught my eye. The next thing I know I’m writing a whole thing about it, comparing it to a garden gnome. The second most unusual thing is probably a paper clip I saw embedded in the asphalt. It made me sad – here was something that would never ever achieve it’s purpose in this world all because someone else was too lazy to pick it up and move it.

Is there anything else you’d like us to know about you?

Hmmm. I can hum and whistle at the same time. Does that count?

 

If you’d like to learn more about Allie Potts’ novels and get a sense of her funny, insightful writing style, check out her blog

How Much Violence Is Too Much in YA Literature?

As a writer of YA science fiction and fantasy, I’m no stranger to writing my heroines into some violent struggles. Whether it’s emotional abuse or outright warfare, somehow these themes are embedded in the hero(ine)’s journey.

But I am also sensitive to the fact the readers of my stories are not adults, like me. When I grapple with violence in my writing, I am aware that my words carry the potential to be a force for good, or to be damaging. Walking that narrow line, without condescending to readers who are smart, sensitive people, is not easy.

Below are the yardsticks I keep in mind when violence erupts in my stories.

Avoid gratuitous violence.
It’s easy to use graphic violence for it’s shock value. As writers, we want to make our readers feel something when they engage with our work. However, it’s not appropriate to use violence or trauma as a shortcut to actual writing and character development. For example, I’ve noticed a number of YA novels recently where the main character is a rape victim. The topic is not explored or an organic part of the story, but rather used as a way to generate instant sympathy for the protagonist. Inevitably, the result is a character that is a shell of a person, defined by what is done to them, rather than who they are. A character that is no more than a victim, rendered lovable only by their trauma (and drop-dead good looks, of course), is not a safe message to pass to a young adult audience.

Focus on the emotional drama of a violent event rather than the gore.
Young adult fantasy seems to have a different metric than other YA literature when it comes to the level of acceptable violence. In fantasy, YA heroes and heroines wield weapons, fight in wars, and kill enemies. But handling that level of violence when writing for young adults requires some delicacy. As a huge fan of Sarah J. Maas, one aspect of her work that I have always admired is her ability to address the psychological impact of the violence in her stories. She includes enough information to set the scene, but doesn’t plunge into the details of gory acts. The reader’s horror is evoked by the reaction of the protagonist, rather than the gore.

Do your due diligence when addressing issues of abuse, depression and suicide.
As writers creating fiction for young adults, we have a responsibility to make sure that our novels do not encourage destructive behavior. A recent example is the Netflix video series 13 Reasons Why, based on a novel of the same name. The story centers around a girl who commits suicide. For teens who are depressed or suicidal, reading about others who act on those feelings can be triggering. That doesn’t mean that authors should avoid those topics. Rather, do your homework and learn what experts say should be emphasized and avoided to craft a story that acts as a force of good (or at least good entertainment).

Address the consequences of violence.
After writing a scene where a character endures violence, remember that the pain lives on long after the act is over. That means that characters need time to heal, and may suffer from PTSD. Aside from the fact that this will make your story deeper and more resonant with readers, it is particularly important for YA audiences to understand that violence has long-lasting repercussions.

Write a book description that makes any violence in your novel explicit.
If your book includes violence, make sure that readers are aware of what they are getting into before opening your book. Your book description should make it clear that you are touching on a sensitive or triggering topic. When marketing your books, reach out to age-appropriate readers, and include disclaimers about the violence.

A Mom’s Take on Maui’s “You’re Welcome” Song from Disney’s Moana

Maybe it was because my 5-year-old decided to write a letter to Santa about all the things mom had done wrong that day.

Maybe it was because my 3-year-old refused to let  me brush her teeth for the umpteenth time until I showed her pictures of rotten teeth on the Internet.

Or maybe it’s just that writer’s block will do strange things to a person.

But that night, when I watched Disney’s Moana for the first time with my husband, and I really sympathized with Maui when Moana came to drag him off on her quest. When he sang the “You’re Welcome” song, all I could think of was my own kids.

I’m always in need of a creative outlet, so I decided to write a spoof of the song. For fun, I added some funny parenting pictures for your viewing pleasure. The singing is by a talented artist, Celeste Notley-Smith. Check it out and let me know what you think!

 

2017 YA Fantasy Trends

captureThe crop of YA fantasy novels this year has been a true delight. It’s still February, and I’ve already ripped my way through hundreds of pages of adventure, anguish, and romance. As a reader, it’s been a blissful escape during a year that has been tumultuous for so many of us already.

As a writer, I’m also excited to see that there is a changing of the guard in terms of the kinds of stories being released. I mean no offense to gritty urban fantasy, heroines who seem born knowing how to fight off all kinds of monsters, and epic battlefield clashes, but it’s refreshing to find stories writ smaller, and more intimately, than ever. The new themes and personalities that are emerging keep writers on their toes and readers enthralled.

Here are some of the themes that I’ve found to be both popular and powerful this year.

capture3Parental (and family) drama takes center stage.
This year’s heroines are not the orphans and loners of yesteryear. They must navigate family politics and expectations, and break out of the childhood roles that bind them in order to find their identities apart from their parents. In Stephanie Garber’s novel, Caraval, the heroine has a father who brutally beats her and her sister. Part of her journey is not only physically escaping his control, but breaking through the mental trauma that defines her. What I love about the emphasis of the integral role of family on a protagonist, for better or for worse, is that it leads us away from the view that you can separate an individual from where they come from. Heroines who are the products of their history feel more personal, and believable.

capture4The power of art to change us and define us.
I have enjoyed the YA fantasy of the past few years taking a concrete approach to strength in its heroines. These women could fight the biggest monsters, wield the most magic, and us their wits and logic to overcome any obstacle. But I didn’t know that I was missing heroines with artistic, sensitive souls that gave them strength. Now, I can’t imagine a heroine without one. My favorite example is from S. Jae-Jones’ novel, Wintersong. Liesl, the protagonist, is a composer, and the power of music is a theme that acts as the glue holding the story together. It deepens and intensifies both the reader’s understanding of the protagonist, and lends believability to the “specialness” that makes her unique to a goblin king.

capture2Love interests who are happy to be “beta” males.
Praise all that is good, this year the alpha male appears to be taking a backseat to a subtler, more fragile and human male specimen. Bulging muscles and overconfidence are taken off their pedestal for men who are interested in the arts, slender in their build, and comfortable letting a woman take the driver’s seat. Sigh. I’m halfway in love, just thinking about them. A prime example is the character of Jest in Marissa Meyer’s Heartless, which was released last November, but I’m still counting in our 2017 trends. Jest is a performer and a lover. He’s heroic in his own right, but he never robs Cath, the protagonist, of her choices. There is the risk that he is too perfect, but I’ll take that when I see a heroine with the ability and choice for forge her own future.

Novels that play with our sense of what’s real.
Maybe it’s because so many of us are questioning if our news, our politics, even our own opinions can be trusted, but there is a distinct theme that I’ve found winding its way through YA fantasy this year. The current crop of protagonists not only don’t know who they can trust, but they also must question the reality of the very world they inhabit. From Caraval to Heartless to Wintersong, the heroines’ stories are upended as they question what is real, and what is part of a game. Maybe that’s what many of us our wishing – that we might wake up, like Alice, and discover that the upside-down world that frightened us was nothing more than a dream.

Any other trends that have caught your eye this year, or books that you’d recommend to a reader always starving for a good YA fantasy?